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June 2, 2021Updated: June 2, 2021 2:39 p.m.

FILE – In this Dec. 1, 2020 file photo, Chairman of the Federal Reserve Jerome Powell appears before the Senate Banking Committee on Capitol Hill in Washington. The Federal Reserve reports that the U.S. economy grew at a somewhat faster pace from early April to late May despite adverse effects from supply chain disruptions. The Fed’s latest survey of economic conditions around the nation released Wednesday, June 2 2021, said that several Fed districts reported positive effects on the economy from increased vaccination rates and relaxed social distancing measures.Susan Walsh/AP

WASHINGTON (AP) — The U.S. economy grew at a somewhat faster pace in April and May despite disruptions that choked supplies to the nations manufacturers, the Federal Reserve reported Wednesday.

In the Fed’s latest survey of economic conditions around the nation, several of the central bank’s districts reported increased vaccination rates and relaxed social-distancing measures were having a positive impact on the economy. But offsetting those gains were economic headwinds coming from supply-chain problems.

The Fed’s report, known as the beige book, is based on surveys conducted by the Fed’s 12 regional banks from early April to late May. The information will form the basis of discussion when Fed policymakers meet on June 15-16 to decide the future course of interest rates.

Most analysts believe that, based on the comments of Fed Chairman Jerome Powell and other Fed officials, the central bank will leave rates where they have been for the past year at a record low of 0% to 0.25% as the central bank continues to promote a strong rebound from the pandemic-triggered recession.