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A bipartisan group of senators on Sunday urged their colleagues to support the Electoral College vote, as at least a dozen GOP senators prepare to challenge the election results on Wednesday. 

GOP Sens. Susan CollinsSusan Margaret CollinsToomey, Murkowski to oppose GOP effort to challenge election results Ex-GOP senator suggests forming new party, calls Trump ‘ringmaster’ of Republicans Hawley jams GOP with Electoral College fight MORE (Maine), Bill CassidyBill CassidyInsurers lose multiyear lobbying fight over surprise medical bills Louisiana Rep.-elect Luke Letlow dies of COVID-19 Don’t let critics derail an imperfect coronavirus relief bill that still has a lot of good in it MORE (La.), Lisa MurkowskiLisa Ann MurkowskiRomney: Plan to challenge election ‘egregious ploy’ that ‘dangerously threatens’ country Toomey, Murkowski to oppose GOP effort to challenge election results 11 Senate Republicans say they will oppose Electoral College results Wednesday MORE (Alaska) and Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyRomney: Plan to challenge election ‘egregious ploy’ that ‘dangerously threatens’ country Toomey, Murkowski to oppose GOP effort to challenge election results 11 Senate Republicans say they will oppose Electoral College results Wednesday MORE (Utah) and Democratic Sens. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinLawmakers share New Year’s messages: ‘Cheers to brighter days ahead’ The Memo: Left seeks leverage to move Biden Bipartisan lawmakers urge Trump to either sign or immediately veto coronavirus relief bill MORE (W.Va.), Mark WarnerMark Robert WarnerIntel vice chair says government agency cyber attack ‘may have started earlier’ Bipartisan, bicameral group urges Trump to sign COVID-19 relief package Relief bill’s passage sets off scramble to declare victory, assign blame MORE (Va.), Jeanne ShaheenCynthia (Jeanne) Jeanne ShaheenSeven Senate races to watch in 2022 How Congress dismissed women’s empowerment Hillicon Valley: Texas, other states bring antitrust lawsuit against Google | Krebs emphasizes security of the election as senators butt heads | Twitter cracks down on coronavirus vaccine misinformation MORE (N.H.), Maggie HassanMargaret (Maggie) HassanSeven Senate races to watch in 2022 Insurers lose multiyear lobbying fight over surprise medical bills Surprise medical bill prevention included in year-end legislative package MORE (N.H.), Dick DurbinDick DurbinGeorgia keeps Senate agenda in limbo Bipartisan lawmakers urge Trump to either sign or immediately veto coronavirus relief bill Biden faces fight with Congress for more coronavirus relief MORE (Ill.) and Independent Sen. Angus KingAngus KingOvernight Defense: Biden team voices concern about ‘abrupt halt’ in Pentagon cooperation | Defense chief pushes back | Lawmakers question whether major cyberattack an act of war Lawmakers ask whether massive hack amounted to act of war Sen. Angus King proposes Netflix, Disney, HBOMax stream free over holidays to stop COVID-19 spread MORE (I-Maine) said in a joint statement that the “election is over.”

“At this point, further attempts to cast doubt on the legitimacy of the 2020 Presidential election are contrary to the clearly expressed will of the American people and only serve to undermine Americans’ confidence in the already determined election results,” they said. 

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“The voters have spoken, and Congress must now fulfill its responsibility to certify the election results. …. It is time to move forward,” they added. 

The joint statement comes a day after 11 GOP senators, led by Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzRomney: Plan to challenge election ‘egregious ploy’ that ‘dangerously threatens’ country Toomey, Murkowski to oppose GOP effort to challenge election results Senate Democrats rebuke GOP colleagues who say they’ll oppose Electoral College results MORE (R-Texas), said they would support challenges to the Electoral College results on Wednesday, when Congress convenes a joint session to formally count the vote. 

Combined with Sen. Josh HawleyJoshua (Josh) David HawleyRomney: Plan to challenge election ‘egregious ploy’ that ‘dangerously threatens’ country Pence ‘welcomes’ efforts of lawmakers to ‘raise objections’ to Electoral College results Toomey, Murkowski to oppose GOP effort to challenge election results MORE (R-Mo.), who had already said he plans to object, that means at least 12 GOP senators will support attempts to overturn President-Elect Joe BidenJoe BidenAppeals court dismisses Gohmert’s election suit against Pence Romney: Plan to challenge election ‘egregious ploy’ that ‘dangerously threatens’ country Pence ‘welcomes’ efforts of lawmakers to ‘raise objections’ to Electoral College results MORE’s win, after he received 306 Electoral College votes to President TrumpDonald TrumpAppeals court dismisses Gohmert’s election suit against Pence Kentucky governor calls vandalism to McConnell’s home ‘unacceptable’ Pence ‘welcomes’ efforts of lawmakers to ‘raise objections’ to Electoral College results MORE’s 232. 

Trump, who has endorsed challenges to the election results in Congress, has claimed that the election was “rigged” or that there was widespread voter fraud. And the 11 GOP senators, in their joint statement on Saturday, alleged that the 2020 election included “unprecedented allegations of voter fraud.”

Dozens of attempts by Trump’s legal team to challenge the results in key states have been dismissed by the courts and election experts have repeatedly rejected claims of widespread voter fraud. Then-Attorney General William BarrBill BarrSenate Democrats rebuke GOP colleagues who say they’ll oppose Electoral College results 11 Senate Republicans say they will oppose Electoral College results Wednesday Proud Boys to attend Jan. 6 DC rallies ‘incognito’ MORE also said last month that his department had found no widespread voter fraud that could change the outcome of the election. 

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But if a member of the House and a member of the Senate support an objection, the two bodies pause the counting of the Electoral College vote, go to their respective chambers and debate the issue for up to two hours. In order for an objection to be successful, something that has never happened before, it would need the support of a majority of both the House and Senate.

The Jan. 6 effort is guaranteed to fall short even in the GOP-controlled Senate, where several members have said they will not support efforts to challenge the election results. 

“I think the overwhelming weight of the evidence is that Joe Biden defeated my candidate Donald Trump and I have to live with it,” Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerSouthwest Airlines says it won’t furlough workers after Trump signed relief bill Former Mississippi Gov. William Winter dies at 97 Senate GOP absences snag Trump nominees MORE (R-Miss.) said on Sunday. 

Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbyBottom line Senators reach deal on Fed powers, setting stage for coronavirus relief passage Congress set to blow past shutdown deadline amid coronavirus talks MORE (R-Ala.), asked about the plan by Sen. Tommy Tuberville (R-Ala.) to object, said that “it’s time to move on.”